zodbshootout ResultsΒΆ

The table below shows typical output of running zodbshootout with etc/sample.conf on a dual core, 2.1 GHz laptop:

"Transaction",                postgresql, mysql,   mysql_mc, zeo_fs
"Add 1000 Objects",                 6529,   10027,     9248,    5212
"Update 1000 Objects",              6754,    9012,     8064,    4393
"Read 1000 Warm Objects",           4969,    6147,    21683,    1960
"Read 1000 Cold Objects",           5041,   10554,     5095,    1920
"Read 1000 Hot Objects",           38132,   37286,    37826,   37723
"Read 1000 Steamin' Objects",    4591465, 4366792,  3339414, 4534382

zodbshootout runs six kinds of tests for each database. For each test, zodbshootout instructs all processes (or threads or greenlets, as configured) to perform similar transactions concurrently, computes the mean duration of the concurrent transactions, takes the mean timing of three test runs, and derives how many objects per second the database is capable of writing or reading under the given conditions.

zodbshootout runs these tests:

  • Add objects

    zodbshootout begins a transaction, adds the specified number of persistent objects to a PersistentMapping, or BTree and commits the transaction. In the sample output above, MySQL was able to add 10027 objects per second to the database, almost twice as fast as ZEO, which was limited to 5212 objects per second. Also, with memcached support enabled, MySQL write performance took a small hit due to the time spent storing objects in memcached.

  • Update objects

    In the same process, without clearing any caches, zodbshootout makes a simple change to each of the objects just added and commits the transaction. The sample output above shows that MySQL and ZEO typically take a little longer to update objects than to add new objects, while PostgreSQL is faster at updating objects in this case. The sample tests only history-preserving databases; you may see different results with history-free databases.

  • Read warm objects

    In a different process, without clearing any caches, zodbshootout reads all of the objects just added. This test favors databases that use either a persistent cache or a cache shared by multiple processes (such as memcached). In the sample output above, this test with MySQL and memcached runs more than ten times faster than ZEO without a persistent cache. (See fs-sample.conf for a test configuration that includes a ZEO persistent cache.)

    In shared thread mode, the database is not closed and reopened, so with concurrency greater than 1, this test is a measure of a shared pickle cache. When concurrency is 1, this test is equivalent to the steamin’ test.

  • Read cold objects

    In the same process as was used for reading warm objects, zodbshootout clears all ZODB caches (the pickle cache, the ZEO cache, and/or memcached) then reads all of the objects written by the update test. This test favors databases that read objects quickly, independently of caching. The sample output above shows that cold read time is currently a significant ZEO weakness.

  • Read hot objects

    In the same process as was used for reading cold objects, zodbshootout clears the in-memory ZODB caches (the pickle cache), but leaves the other caches intact, then reads all of the objects written by the update test. This test favors databases that have a process-specific cache. In the sample output above, all of the databases have that type of cache.

  • Read steamin’ objects

    In the same process as was used for reading hot objects, zodbshootout once again reads all of the objects written by the update test. This test favors databases that take advantage of the ZODB pickle cache. As can be seen from the sample output above, accessing an object from the ZODB pickle cache is around 100 times faster than any operation that requires network access or unpickling.